digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes) DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes) digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes) DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes) digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes) DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes) digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes) DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes)

Remember the PDP

DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes) digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes) DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes) digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes) DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes) digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes) DIGITAL80.GIF (614 bytes) digital-blue.jpg (45951 bytes)


                                                                                  Back to the Celebration home1.gif (20220 bytes)page


     PDP 1   ( 1960 )                             PDP4  ( 1964 )

The PDP-1, the world's first small, interactive computer is delivered to Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN), a computer consulting firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

DIGITAL's second 18-bit computer.
Similar in structure to the PDP-1, the PDP-4 used slower memory and different packaging to achieve a lower price of $65,000. Approximately 54 PDP-4s were sold in application areas as diverse as nuclear physics, production and stock control.

pdp1.GIF (76233 bytes)    pdp4.GIF (44793 bytes)


         PDP 5 ( 1963 )                                        PDP 6  ( 1964 )

DIGITAL's first 12-bit machine, the PDP-5, is announced.

 

Digital unveils its first 36-bit computer, the PDP-6.

pdp5.GIF (35022 bytes)      pdp6.GIF (42252 bytes)


                PDP 7 ( 1964 )                                      PDP 8  ( 1965 )

Digital's third 18-bit
A successor to the PDP-4, the PDP-7 used smaller, more conventional system units and was well received in laboratory and data acquisition applications. The machine featured DIGITAL's first mass-storage based operating system (DECsys for DECtape). Ultimately, 120 PDP-7s were produced and sold.

 

Introduction of the PDP-8, the world's first mass-produced minicomputer.

 pdp7.GIF (74044 bytes)     pdp8.GIF (48687 bytes)


               PDP 8-S   ( 1966 )                                     PDP 8-I  ( 1968 )

The PDP-8/S is introduced as an economical alternative to the "classic" PDP-8.

 

The PDP-8/I is DIGITAL's third 12-bit computer system and the first to be implemented with integrated circuits.

pdp8s-mdl.gif (57589 bytes)    pdp8i.jpg (11493 bytes)


    PDP 8-E  ( 1970 )                                   PDP 9 ( 1966 )

The PDP-8/E featured the OMNIBUS -- a patented synchronous bus that handles bi-directional communication between system elements. A single OMNIBUS contained enough slots to handle up to 32K words of core memory, or up to 10 peripheral controllers. Shortly after the introduction of the PDP-8/E, DIGITAL installed its 10,000th computer system.

 

The PDP-9, DIGITAL's fourth 18-bit computer system ships.

The PDP-9 featured a speed increase of approximately twice that of the PDP-7. The PDP-9 was also one of the first small or medium scale computers to have a keyboard monitor system based on DIGITAL's own small magnetic tape units (DECtape).

pdp8e.jpg (29750 bytes)    pdp9.GIF (39711 bytes)


               PDP 9 ( 1966 )                                         PDP 10  ( 1967 )

The PDP-1, the world's first small, interactive computer is delivered to Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN), a computer consulting firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

Similar in structure to the PDP-1, the PDP-4 used slower memory and different packaging to achieve a lower price of $65,000. Approximately 54 PDP-4s were sold in application areas as diverse as nuclear physics, production and stock control.

 pdp9.GIF (39711 bytes)      pdp10.jpg (16452 bytes)



  Click Here to go to the PDP 11 Page

 


            PDP 12  ( 1969 )                                           PDP 14 ( 1969 )

The PDP-1, the world's first small, interactive computer is delivered to Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN), a computer consulting firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

Similar in structure to the PDP-1, the PDP-4 used slower memory and different packaging to achieve a lower price of $65,000. Approximately 54 PDP-4s were sold in application areas as diverse as nuclear physics, production and stock control.

pdp12.jpg (20548 bytes)    pdp14.jpg (12312 bytes)


          PDP 15 (  1969 )                                    PDP 16 ( 1971 )

 

The PDP-1, the world's first small, interactive computer is delivered to Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN), a computer consulting firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

Similar in structure to the PDP-1, the PDP-4 used slower memory and different packaging to achieve a lower price of $65,000. Approximately 54 PDP-4s were sold in application areas as diverse as nuclear physics, production and stock control.

 pdp15.jpg (13557 bytes)    pdp16m.jpg (22370 bytes)

Back to Top


Copyright 1998 [Cornelis van Pieterson, The Netherlands].
All rights reserved.

Revised: May 31, 2007